A blog dedicated to tidbits of software information related to the AEC industry. Most tips and tricks are roughly 60 seconds because, "Hey who doesn't have 60 seconds".
*The views and opinions expressed in this blog do not reflect those of my employer.

Monday, November 25, 2013

Using View Filters to Control Shade and Transparency of Glazing

I wanted to control shading of glazing on a project. Rather than do this per view, I made a filter to use everywhere, simple but effective. Check it out below

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Autodesk 360 Rendering Contest

I thought I would do a quick post on the Autodesk Rendering contest. It turns out the voting is now live and you can view my entry here http://promoshq.wildfireapp.com/website/6/contests/330181/voteable_entries/68883530 Go check it out, there are some really nice renderings on there. -JP

Friday, November 15, 2013

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Larger Views When Inserting Families

A lot of times I get asked, "How can I preview the families before I load them?" well, there are addins that can accomplish this. But, why not just use a functionality windows already has? (As you can see this will only work if the person managing your library saves the file in a nice axon view)

Friday, November 1, 2013

Movable text in annotation families

It turns out in Revit, we are able to create detail groups. This is interesting because now within the detail group we can add reference lines to dimension to.

This means we can control text location inside of families. (View Title Anyone?)



Below is a video I made to demonstrate it to others at the office I work at.


                           


Thursday, October 31, 2013

What is sixtysecond.revit?

This is a blog to discuss Revit tips tricks and quirks I've experienced using this software daily. This blog also serves as a means to share thoughts regarding the ever changing field of Architecture.


My goal is to post videos of tips/tricks that are 60 seconds or less on a regular basis. I feel that a 60 second video is a lot easier to watch than a long drawn out explanation.

For my first post, here's a helpful image.